Baptism in the Bible & in the Church

Baptism in the New Testament and in the Church

 

1.New Testament baptism is commanded by Jesus. 

      Matthew 28:18-20

Jesus is talking to His disciples for the last time before He goes to Heaven and gives them their job description, which includes the command to go, make disciples, baptize and teach.  Jesus expects His followers to be baptized because it identifies a person with Jesus. 

2.New Testament baptism is only for those who are saved.  

      Acts 2:41; 8:12; 16:14-15; 16:30-33; 18:8

Take time to look up these examples from the book of Acts in the New Testament.  New Testament baptism is something only done by those who have made a decision to believe in Jesus, and in each case baptism is done after salvation.

3.New Testament baptism is by immersion (being dunked in water). 

      Matthew 3:13-17; Acts 8:26-40.

The greek word for baptize literally means “to dip, or immerse” and this is exactly what is seen in the New Testament.

Matthew 3:13-17 tells the story of Jesus’ baptism, which was like an announcement that His public ministry was beginning.  In verse 16 the Bible says “Jesus came up immediately from the water,” which gives the idea of complete immersion as done by John the Baptist.

In Acts 8:26-40 Philip talks to an Ethiopian eunuch about Christ, and this man is baptized by Philip.  Verses 38-39 again give the picture of going completely into the water and then being immersed, and then coming out of the water to complete the baptism.

At FBC Friona we follow the New Testament example and expectation of baptism by following these guidelines:

  • Believers Baptism.  Only those who are saved will be baptized.
  • Baptism by Immersion.  All baptisms will be done by immersing the believer in water, unless extreme circumstances lead to another course of action.
  • Baptismal Obedience.  We expect everyone who is saved to be baptized because this is the New Testament expectation and example.  Church membership is dependent upon salvation and New Testament baptism.
  • New Testament baptism, as described above, from other denominations or churches of like belief is recognized and accepted as valid Christian baptism when individuals are seeking to be members of the church.